How to Paint Verdigris + Metallics (Gutplates)

If you have any questions / comments, please feel free to post on the forum thread for this tutorial.

Verdigris, Washes, Metal, Gutplates.


So before we get to the not quite pretty pictures I'll do some explanations of why I use various washes on various metallics, throughout I'll be talking about the GW ones exclusively unless I mention otherwise.

#1 2 Washes is nearly always better than one, not too thick, let them dry between layers, White Dwarf Number (can anyone help me out here) had a great article about using them written by John Blanche a couple of months back, seek it out!

Washes on Silver
Black - darkens shadows, makes contrasts more extreme.
Sepia - Ages things, makes them sepia looking (unsurprisingly), yellows them, great for tarnished looking stuff.
Devlan - Jack of all trades, shades your stuff for you :)
Ogryn - Interesting effect, brings a little warmth, I prefer Sepia:Devlan:Red 2:2:1ish though for similar(better) effects.
Purple - Makes things look more 'magic', useful if you've got purple elsewhere to tie in, or orange to contast
Green - As above, but yellow to contrast, also can make stuff look mouldy :)
Blue - 'Magic' but in a very crisp clean cool way, takes down the temperature of the piece, good for high elves.
Red - Not used this much, many layers can make a very nice evil looking armour though, by many i mean about 10:S

Washes on Gold/Bronze
Black - darkens shadows, makes contrasts more extreme.
Sepia - Ages things, makes them sepia looking (unsurprisingly), yellows them, great for tarnished looking stuff.
Devlan - Jack of all trades, shades your stuff for you :)
Ogryn - Interesting effect, brings a little warmth, I prefer Sepia:Devlan:Red 2:2:1ish though for similar(better) effects.
Purple - Works brilliantly, love the effect of this
Green - As above, if a model has multiple golds I often use both on different pieces to sepparate.
Blue - Not really used this ever, makes for nice interesting contrasted shadows, wouldn't hit something all over though.
Red - Like, hot hot hot, really brings warmth to a piece.


So here we go with some pictures, I used these colours in this order for the prep work (photobucket deleted my pictures):
#1 Primed Halfords Grey,
#2 Undercoated scorched brown (use calthan for lighter bronze/gold, snakebite for mega shiney)
#3 Dwarf Bronze/tin bitz
#4 Dwarf Bronze/shining gold Highlight (Burnished Gold for mentally shiny)

Step 5

Two coats of devlan mud - let it dry thoroughly between each


Step 6 This is a wet palette, I live by the wet palette, it cost me 99p (sponges) and is made from a firebelly tray (lid keeps it wet overnight), wet sponges, and baking paper, capillary action steadily sucks water through to your paint meaning it doesn't dry out so fast.


Step 7
Hawk Turqoise: Frankly the best colour ever released, mixed VERY thin, skimmed milk or less, wet palette stops it from drying out and making another batch of a different consistency.

Alternate Verdigris Mixes/Additions
+Dark Angels Green (usually followed by a 'highlight' of straight HT as above), slightly darker
+Goblin Green - A bit more..gren :?
+Skull White - Gives a very different (somewhat more realistic) look, you can mix all of the above, play around!
I'm pondering about doing one every weekend or something, we'll see how it goes, I've got a few sets of pictures prepped so I may build up some credit and put out a slew of them in the next few days when my eyes need a break from painting thundertusk horns...

Step 8
Either blob it all over, or concentrate on recesses, I chose the latter:


Step 9
Let it Dry


Done, here's it on a unit of leadbelchers' cannon :